“The Diary of a Teenage Girl” – Sep 6th

Join the Boston Sunday Night Film Club this Sunday, Sep 6th at 7:15p for The Diary of a Teenage Girl at the Coolidge Corner Theatre. Look for Dan wearing a multicolored shirtin the theatre lobby about 15 minutes before the film. As always, after the film we will descend on a local establishment for dinner/drinks/discussion.

A teen artist living in 1970s San Francisco enters into an affair with her mother’s boyfriend.

“The Man from U.N.C.L.E.” – Aug 30th

Join the Boston Sunday Night Film Club this Sunday, Aug 30th at 6:55p for The Man from U.N.C.L.E. at the Regal Fenway Stadium 13. Look for Sean wearing a nametagin the theatre lobby about 15 minutes before the film. As always, after the film we will descend on a local establishment for dinner/drinks/discussion.

In the early 1960s, CIA agent Napoleon Solo and KGB operative Illya Kuryakin participate in a joint mission against a mysterious criminal organization, which is working to proliferate nuclear weapons.

“Call Me Lucky” – Aug 23rd

Join the Boston Sunday Night Film Club this Sunday, Aug 23rd at 7:30p for Call Me Lucky at the Somerville Theatre. Look for Sean wearing a nametagin the theatre lobby about 15 minutes before the film. As always, after the film we will descend on a local establishment for dinner/drinks/discussion.

Barry Crimmins is pissed. His hellfire brand of comedy has rained verbal lightning bolts on American audiences and politicians for decades, yet you’ve probably never heard of him. But once you’ve experienced Bobcat Goldthwait’s brilliant character portrait of him and heard Crimmins’s secret, you will never forget him. From his unmistakable bullish frame came a scathingly ribald stand-up style that took early audiences by force. Through stark, smart observation and judo-like turns of phrase, Crimmins’s rapid-fire comedy was a war on ignorance and complacency in ’80s America at the height of an ill-considered foreign policy. Crimmins discusses another side of his character, revealing in detail a dark and painful past that inspired his life-changing campaign of activism in the hope of saving others from a similar experience. Interviews with comics like Margaret Cho and Marc Maron illustrate Crimmins’s love affair with comedy and his role in discovering and supporting the development of many of today’s stars. As a venerated member of America’s comic community, Crimmins could be your newest national treasure. Just don’t tell him that.

“The Third Man” – Aug 16th

Join the Boston Sunday Night Film Club this Sunday, Aug 16th at 4:20p for The Third Man at the Kendall Square Cinema. Look for Sean wearing a nametag in the theatre lobby about 15 minutes before the film. As always, after the film we will descend on a local establishment for dinner/drinks/discussion.

Pulp novelist Holly Martins travels to shadowy, postwar Vienna, only to find himself investigating the mysterious death of an old friend, Harry Lime.

“Mr. Holmes” – Aug 9th

Join the Boston Sunday Night Film Club this Sunday, Aug 9th at 6:50p for Mr. Holmes at the Kendall Square Cinema. Look for Sean wearing a nametagin the theatre lobby about 15 minutes before the film. As always, after the film we will descend on a local establishment for dinner/drinks/discussion.

An aged, retired Sherlock Holmes looks back on his life, and grapples with an unsolved case involving a beautiful woman.

“Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation” – Aug 2nd

Join the Boston Sunday Night Film Club this Sunday, Aug 2nd at 5:10p for Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation at the AMC Assembly Row 12 . Look for Sean wearing a nametag in the theatre lobby about 15 minutes before the film. As always, after the film we will descend on a local establishment for dinner/drinks/discussion.

Note: Assembly Row has reserved seating, so buy your tickets in advance to ensure you A) get a seat and 2) get a seat you want.

Ethan and team take on their most impossible mission yet, eradicating the Syndicate – an International rogue organization as highly skilled as they are, committed to destroying the IMF.

“Trainwreck” – Jul 26th

Join the Boston Sunday Night Film Club this Sunday, Jul 26th at 4:30p for Trainwreck at the Somerville Theatre . Look for Sean wearing a nametag in the theatre lobby about 15 minutes before the film. As always, after the film we will descend on a local establishment for dinner/drinks/discussion.

Having thought that monogamy was never possible, a commitment-phobic career woman may have to face her fears when she meets a good guy.

“Ant-Man” – Jul 19th

Join the Boston Sunday Night Film Club this Sunday, Jul 19th at 6p for Ant-Man at the AMC Boston Common 19 . Look for Sean wearing a nametag in the theatre lobby about 15 minutes before the film. As always, after the film we will descend on a local establishment for dinner/drinks/discussion.

Armed with a super-suit with the astonishing ability to shrink in scale but increase in strength, con-man Scott Lang must embrace his inner hero and help his mentor, Dr. Hank Pym, plan and pull off a heist that will save the world.

Note: Probably a good idea to buy tickets in advance.

“Cartel Land” – Jul 12th

Join the Boston Sunday Night Film Club this Sunday, Jul 12th at 7:10p for Cartel Land at the Kendall Square Cinema . Look for Sean wearing a nametag in the theatre lobby about 15 minutes before the film. As always, after the film we will descend on a local establishment for dinner/drinks/discussion.

A harrowing look at the journeys of two modern-day vigilante groups and their shared enemythe murderous Mexican drug cartels.

“Underworld U.S.A.” – Jul 5th

Join the Boston Sunday Night Film Club this Sunday, Jul 5th at 7p for Underworld U.S.A. at the Harvard Film Archive . Look for Sean wearing a nametag in the theatre lobby about 15 minutes before the film. As always, after the film we will descend on a local establishment for dinner/drinks/discussion.

Underworld U.S.A. is among the fiercest, starkest and most unsparing of the many studio films made about organized crime, a popular and perennial topic in Hollywood since the mid-1940s. Like Joseph H. Lewis’ The Undercover Man (1949) or Phil Karlson’s The Brothers Rico (1957) before it, Fuller’s film turns away from the expressionist noir vision of crime long favored in Hollywood and towards a bleaker, barer and menacingly abstract portrayal of criminality. Fuller goes even further, however, by stripping his film of almost any sentimentality and by making even his protagonist deeply unsympathetic and possibly psychopathic. A revenge saga starring a remarkably sinister Cliff Robertson as a failed burglar determined to track down the killers of his criminal father, Underworld U.S.A. follows the young man’s violent path up the crooked ladder of the syndicate that holds a stern grip over vice. For his unsparing depiction of brutal violence and his reduction of character to vicious and brilliantly efficient caricaturessuch as Richard Rust’s ruthless hit manFuller’s hard-hitting film anticipates the blood-soaked yakuza masterpieces of Kinji Fukasaku.